DE

 

The hat, as a covering for the head, has the general sense of something that epitomizes the head. Just as in summing up we bring ideas under one head. […] so that the hat, as a sort of leading idea, covers the whole personality and imparts it own significance to it. Coronation endows the ruler with the divine nature of the sun, the doctor’s hood bestows the dignity of a scholar, and a stranger’s hat imparts a strange personality.

Jung, Collected works, Vol. 12, § 53

HATS - A Short Anthology from the Jung Family Archives

The first of the special exhibitions planned at the Museum C.G. Jung House is dedicated to Carl Gustav and Emma Jung-Rauschenbach’s broad scope of interests and work. Relying on a selection of hats from the extensive collection held in the family archives, the show sheds light on key phases in the couple’s life, their work as researchers, their habits along with some of their likes and preferences. C.G. Jung’s varied headgear and Emma’s sundry hats symbolize their professional training and careers, but they also tell of adventurous journeys, award ceremonies and festive galas. Jung’s fraternity kepi, the army helmet and the mortarboard are references to his formative years; the homburg accompanied him when travelling to scientific symposia and during official receptions, while the silk scholar’s cap never left the study; the pith helmets protected him on his journeys to distant continents; the rather baggy felt hats bear reference to the handyman side in him, for instance, in connection with the building of Bollingen Tower. The photograph on the driving licence shows Emma Rauschenbach in 1929 wearing a fashionable cloche hat. Lofty straw hats came in handy when C.G. and Emma Jung visited the annual Eranos meetings in the Ticino, while the elegant ladies’ hats along with the bowler and top hat came into their own on festive occasions.

 

The hat, as a covering for the head, has the general sense of something that epitomizes the head. Just as in summing up we bring ideas under one head. […] so that the hat, as a sort of leading idea, covers the whole personality and imparts it own significance to it. Coronation endows the ruler with the divine nature of the sun, the doctor’s hood bestows the dignity of a scholar, and a stranger’s hat imparts a strange personality.

Jung, Collected works, Vol. 12, § 53